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Catholic contemplative life and devotion

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Lenten Devotions

Mary and Lectio Divina

* I know I am writing about Mary a lot lately. My plans for Lent this year are to spend it with her trying to see the Gospel through her eyes and to emphasize Scripture in my daily life. Ave Maria Mater Verbum de.

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly… (Colossians 3:16a)

Lectio Divina involves reflectively reading a passage of the Bible (Lectio,) pondering the word or phrase that stood out to you until you receive light on what God is saying in your soul through that word or phrase (Meditatio.) Then one responds back to God in prayer, (Oratio) then rests in his love (contemplatio.) One then takes action on the fruits of the prayer(Actio.)
If you think about it, Mary could be seen as Lectio Divina itself. Her life was one beautiful flow of all the steps of this prayer.
She received the Word of God, (Lectio) nurturing him in herself; in her body and in her heart. (Meditatio, Contemplatio.) She sang out her praise in her Magnificat. (Oratio) She then brought forth this Word made flesh into the world, caring for him as mother (Actio.)

She not only did this, she continued to do this through her lived experience with Jesus, reflecting on each event, each word, in her heart. To every sign of God’s will she responded generously.

When a woman shouted out to Jesus from a crowd, “Blessed is the womb that carried you, and the breasts that nursed you!” (Luke 11:27) he answered, “Rather, blessed are those who hear the word of God and keep it.”

As I read it, Jesus meant that to see Mary as a holy receptacle, as merely his biological mother, as the woman in the crowd seemed to imply, would be to dismiss the Mother of the Word and what she is here to teach us by her life and being. “I would rather you do what she has done. Hear the word of God and keep it!”

He did tell us that we can and should do all he was doing (Jn. 14:12,) and, in this interaction, also what Mary had done and was doing.

She received every little seed of the Gospel with joy, planting it in the good soil of her heart where it bore a hundred fold (Mtt. 13:8.) She gave all, and so she received all; in good measure, overflowing, shaken down to make room for even more, poured into the hem of [her] garment. (Luke 6:38)

There is a saying that Mary “never keeps anything for herself.” She shares her bounty with you! And she takes you to Jesus to drink even more deeply of his love than you could otherwise, because her soul magnifies the Lord in us.

When we pray with Mary, she guides us in quiet hidden ways, bringing us us into a more vivid prayer infused with her knowledge and love of Jesus.

We don’t only call her blessed. We become what she is.

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Stations of the Cross, with love from Mary

 

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After Christ’s Ascension, Mary, the mother of Jesus, would go out and walk the way of the Cross again, the way of our salvation and hers. She could be seen sometimes in the early morning, walking slowly, pausing.”He fell here. And again here. He spoke to the women here.”

Her prayers of Good Friday returned to mind, “My Son, my Son, my Lord, how far will this go? How much of this will You allow? If it be Your will, let me  suffer all with You, die with you! My Son, God’s Son. I will go with you as far as I can.”

She remembered, “This is where our eyes met. This is when I knew. Here is the place where Simon of Cyrene took up the Cross. Here is where Jesus was crucified and- unthinkably, died. Oh what those people said to Him, what they did to Him! Father, forgive them! May His mercy capture their hearts forever! Let me lead our children, Father. Allow me to lead them by heart and prayer, to our Son.”

And then she would walk back to her home with John, grinding grain and making cakes for his breakfast, kneading bread for the visitors who would come, spending her day in prayer and service, humbly telling the story of her Son to all who wanted to be set free.

So much of the Gospel depended on her witness. And her sons, the Apostles, needed her prayer and presence. She would stay as long as she was needed, until God took her home to her Son. As Spouse of the Holy Spirit, she prayed for, companioned, and mothered the early Church, living also as a daughter of the Church as long as God willed her to stay on earth.

People started to follow her when she walked the way of the cross. At first a small group of the women disciples walked with her. Soon many people went out early and walked with her in the quiet morning, recounting and reflecting on the Lord’s Passion and death, reflecting on what had been done for them, and that His spirit within them was so real it would raise their bodies, too, from the dead. In awe of the living proof and witness of His divinity and humanity that she was, they, too, paused in silence, and in that silence the Scriptures were opened for them, and their hearts burned within them as the Spirit, too, accompanied them and taught them all they needed to know as they walked with His Bride, the little and simple, humble and human Mary, mother of Jesus.

As persecution grew, barricades were set up by the authorities to keep the Christians from walking the Via Dolorosa, and the Apostle John took Mary with him to Ephesus for her protection.

There, she carried stones she had brought from Jerusalem to the back of the house and set them along a path she marked out in and around the garden. She would pause at each one of the markers she had made, pause and remember: Here He fell, and again here. He spoke to the women here. Our eyes met here. Simon took up the cross here.

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In the end there were fourteen stations where she could stop to pray. The Ephesians from John’s church would visit her and walk this way of the Cross with her, and with her remember and reflect on all that had happened.

The Gospel had not yet been written. But it was recorded and treasured in the heart and in the footsteps of this mother who, lowly and barefoot, walked and pondered, in remembrance of her Son’s suffering and death. This walking reflection of hers became the Stations of the Cross represented in every Catholic Church, on which we meditate each Friday of Lent to this day, and especially on Good Friday, the day of our Redemption.

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This is only a legend about the evolution of the Stations of the Cross, filled out by my prayerful imagination, but it makes deep sense to me. In a way it is true whether it’s factual or not. Mary is the one who treasured the truth about Our Lord for us in her heart. She was the one person who truly knew where He came from. There are parts of the Gospel that could have only come from her, including some of her inmost thoughts… and the fact that she treasured and reflected on all these things in her heart. Even if she never walked the Stations of the Cross in such ritual fashion while on earth, though it is easy to imagine she did, we know she carried it in her heart. We remember her, and she remembers us when we pray it now, and she joins us, her Son’s Church, in prayer, as she always did.

I attended the Stations of the Cross the evening of this writing. This time I walked it in my soul with Mary, from the original events of Good Friday to after the Ascension, to her last days in Ephesus, joining her on the Way of the Cross, consciously drawing on her memories.

Learning from Mary is so easy. She is full of grace. It’s what she has to share.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you–because by your Holy Cross, You have redeemed the world.

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